Christian Aid – Black Christians’ views on climate justice
Comparing Black British Christians’ views towards climate justice with those of the general public.

The results show that Black British Christians feel more informed about climate change than the public at large, are more likely to make low carbon lifestyle choices, but feel the climate movement isn’t racially diverse enough.

  • Two thirds (66%) of Black British Christians feel they know at least a fair amount about climate change, compared to half (49%) of the British public.
  • Black Christians who were born in a country more vulnerable to climate change are more likely than those born in the UK or born in a less vulnerable country to say they know at least a fair amount about climate change (75% vs. 65% vs. 64% respectively).
  • Black Christians are twice as likely as the general public to make lifestyle changes to reduce their carbon footprint or engage in campaigns or protests. These include them being more likely to take eco-friendly forms of travel (18% vs 9%), installing solar panels (8% vs 4%) or buying an electric car (8% vs 4%).
  • More than half of Black Christians (51%) don’t think the climate movement is racially diverse enough, compared to 33% of the British public as a whole.
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Date Published
09/10/2020
Client
Christian Aid
Methodology
Savanta ComRes interviewed 500 Black British Christian adults between 7 and 19 August 2020. Savanta ComRes used panel-based recruitment and Christian Aid used open link recruitment by sharing the survey among their networks. Savanta ComRes also interviewed 2,138 GB adults online between 21 and 23 August 2020. Data were weighted to be nationally representative of all GB adults by key demographic characteristics including age, gender, region and social grade. Savanta ComRes is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.
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