Sunday Mirror / Independent on Sunday Political Poll

Methodology: ComRes interviewed 2,034 GB adults online 11-13 June 2014. Data were weighted to be demographically representative of all GB adults. Data were also weighted by past vote recall. ComRes is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules. Full tables on the ComRes website.

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Date Published
13 Jun 2014

Further Description

Prince William is more popular than the Queen, according to a ComRes poll for tomorrow's Sunday Mirror and Independent on SundayPrince Charles is less favourably regarded, only a little more popular than Boris Johnson, the highest-scoring politician on the list. 

The poll puts Labour's lead over the Conservatives at two points, the lowest in the ComRes online series since February 2012:

Con 32% (+3)
Lab 34% (+1)
LD 7% (-1)
UKIP 18% (-1)
Green 4% (0)
Other 5% (-2)

(Change since last month in brackets.) If those figures were repeated in the general election next year, Ed Miliband would have a majority of about 24. 

Favourability Index 

ComRes asked, "Please indicate whether you have a favourable or unfavourable view of each of the following." The figures show the percentage replying "favourable", and the net score, "favourable" minus "unfavourable":

Prince William 68% +59
The Queen 63% +51
Prince Charles 43% +22
Boris Johnson 41% +13
David Cameron 28% -18
Nigel Farage 26% -18
William Hague 25% -10
George Osborne 19% -25
Ed Miliband 19% -30
Theresa May 16% -22
Nick Clegg 13% -41
Michael Gove 9% -38

David Cameron is the most popular party leader, just ahead of Nigel Farage and 9 points higher than Ed Miliband, whose "unfavourable" rating, 49% is also higher than the Prime Minister's, 46%. 

George Osborne's rating has improved since April, his net favourable score going from -32 to -25. He is now – just – less unpopular than Ed Miliband. 

Nigel Farage's rating has become less favourable since April, going from -12 to -18, mostly caused by a 5-point rise in his "unfavourable" score. None of the ratings for other politicians whom we have polled before has changed significantly.

Following their recent spat, Theresa May appears more popular than Michael Gove among the British public – 16% say that they have a favourable view of May, compared with just 9% for Gove. Among those who say that they would vote Conservative, May is far more popular than Gove: 35% say that they view May favourably, compared with 21% for Gove.

 

Full figures:

 

Favourable

Unfavourable

Neither

Don’t know

NET favourability (April in brackets)

Prince William

68%

9%

20%

4%

59

The Queen

63%

12%

21%

4%

51

Prince Charles

43%

21%

31%

5%

22

Boris Johnson

41%

28%

24%

7%

+13

David Cameron

28%

46%

20%

5%

-18 (-20)

Nigel Farage

26%

44%

21%

9%

-18 (-12)

William Hague

25%

35%

30%

10%

-10

George Osborne

19%

44%

28%

9%

-25 (-32)

Ed Miliband

19%

49%

25%

7%

-30 (-29)

Theresa May

16%

38%

32%

14%

-22

Nick Clegg

13%

54%

27%

6%

-41 (-43)

Michael Gove

9%

47%

26%

18%

-38

 

British Values

 

After Michael Gove said this week that he wanted schools to "promote British values", ComRes asked: "Which of the following would you say are the most important British values?" (Respondents could name up to three from a list of 12.)

Freedom of speech 48%
Respect for the rule of law 34%
Fairness 27%
Tolerance 27%
A sense of humour 26%
Equality 24%
Politeness 22%
Political freedom 20%
Responsibility 14%
Religious freedom 12%
Aspiration 3%
Curiosity 2%
Don’t know 7%

Freedom of speech is the most commonly selected value among men and women, all age groups, all social grades and supporters of all four main parties. Respect for the rule of law is more popular among Conservative and UKIP supporters – 43% of Conservatives and 44% of UKIP supporters chose it, compared with 34% of British adults overall.

 

Methodology: ComRes interviewed 2,034 GB adults online 11-13 June 2014. Data were weighted to be demographically representative of all GB adults. Data were also weighted by past vote recall. ComRes is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules. Full tables on the ComRes website.

 

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